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WWV/H Scientific Modulation Working Group --- WW0WWV Report

Discussion in 'General Announcements' started by W0PV, Oct 9, 2021.

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  1. W0PV

    W0PV Ham Member QRZ Page

    For some its rough being an analog man in a digital world as WB6ACU laments below. :( For others it's a Renaissance of discovery. :)

     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2021
    N0TZU likes this.
  2. AJ4GQ

    AJ4GQ XML Subscriber QRZ Page

    Kinda like this? Appropriately named HAMster Man.

    HamsterMan.gif
     
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  3. W0PV

    W0PV Ham Member QRZ Page

    There is another way to collaborate with the HamSCI group using WWV that does NOT require a Raspberry Pi, by contributing to their next "Frequency Measurement Festival" during an Antarctic solar eclipse coming up in December.

    That just requires a radio and PC that may already be used for digi modes like FT8, but instead running FLDIGI freeware. Having a GPSDO is best, but still not required.

    Looks like it could be a fun project to set up on a spare receiver, or even the main rig if its not being heavily used over some of those days.

    Here is their explanation for what and how the data will be used in research.

    Introduction

    Changes in ionospheric electron density caused by space weather and diurnal solar changes are known to cause Doppler shifts on HF ray paths. For example, see Figure 7 in Boitman et al., 1999. HamSCI's first attempt at a measurement of these Doppler shifts was during the August 2017 total solar eclipse. We plan a careful measurement during the 2024 eclipse. As part of the WWV centennial, 50 stations collected Doppler shift data for the original Festival of Frequency Measurement, demonstrating the value of volunteer participation in collecting this data. This year, we request that all amateur radio stations, shortwave listeners, and others capable of making high-quality HF frequency measurements help us collect frequency data for the December 4 solar eclipse across Antarctica.


    [​IMG]
    Research Questions

    How do the propagation paths of shortwave time standard stations vary over a calendar day?

    What properties of the ionosphere are we able to measure by observing the variation in these HF propagation paths?

    What effect will the annular eclipse have on these propagation paths?

    How do various measurement techniques for understanding the path variation compare?

    Is there volunteer interest in collecting data in the regions near totality for this eclipse?

    Objectives

    Promote international goodwill by working with citizen scientists around the globe


    Measure Doppler shifts caused by space weather's effects on the ionosphere.


    Times

    Data recording starts: 01 December 2021, 0000 UTC
    Data recording ends: 10 December 2021, 2359 UTC


    How to receive, measure and decode the data is explained on these links,

    Main Web Page

    December 2021 Eclipse Festival of Frequency Measurement

    How to Collect Doppler Data With Your HF Radio

    More info -

    I was curious if it was necessary to be within the eclipse shadow zone for data to be relevant, so I emailed Kristina and received this reply,

    Thanks for checking in! Data collection far from the path of totality is still useful. I'm looking for traveling ionospheric disturbances, which can travel hundreds of kilometers, and for ionospheric effects that turn up in the northern hemisphere as a result of events in the southern. 73,-KC

    You may find this article interesting
    : Solar eclipse caused bow waves in Earth's atmosphere -MIT Haystack Observatory researchers find that the moon's shadow created long-predicted ionospheric bow waves during the August eclipse.
     
    AA5BK likes this.
  4. W5UAA

    W5UAA Ham Member QRZ Page

    @W0PV - Well that looks like something I can do. Checking for "bow waves" created from solar eclipses across the south pole here in Texas! Being a sailor, I understand the concept of the atmosphere acting like the ocean. And I've spend hundreds of hours watching the "bow wave" I've made in water from the helm of my sail boat. It's easy for me to conceptualize a "bow wave" in the atmosphere created by a solar eclipse. I have five weeks to make sure I'm ready. I think all I have to do is make sure my version of FLDigi is correct. And then set up one of my computers and one of my radios on an UPS... and then leave it on for the first ten days in December.

    SWEET!
     
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